Parish announcements this week

Christ is in our midst!

1. WELCOME ALL NEW PARISHIONERS! New parishioners are always welcome in our parish. If someone wishes to join, please contact Father Iura Godenciuc at 203 865-0388 or our financial secretary Natalie Chermak at 203 468-0367.

2. Fallen Asleep in the Lord: Please remember in your prayers Bessie Pluskwik. May her memory be eternal!

3. FREEDOM PRAYER for the FOURTH OF JULY: O God our Creator, through the power and working of your Holy Spirit, you call us to live out our faith in the midst of the world, bringing the light and the saving truth of the Gospel to every corner of society. We ask you to bless us in our vigilance for the gift of religious liberty. Give us the strength of mind and heart to readily defend our freedoms when they are threatened; give us courage in making our voices heard on behalf of the rights of your Church and the freedom of conscience of all people of faith. Grant, we pray, O heavenly Father, a clear and united voice to all your sons and daughters gathered in your Church in this decisive hour in the history of our nation, so that, with every trial withstood and every danger overcome — for the sake of our children, our grandchildren, and all who come after us — this great land will always be “one nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.” We ask this through Christ our Lord.

4. ROOF REPAIR FUND: Please make a generous contribution to allow us to repair the leaking roof of the Church Hall and other roof structures adjoining the Church and the Hall. These roofs must be repaid to prevent serious water damage to our property and we cannot pay for them from regular weekly collection. Roof Repair Fund envelope are available in the vestibule of our church for your special sacrificial gift. Thank you for helping to keep our physical structures in good condition for our use today and for the next generation tomorrow.

5. K of C: The Knights of Columbus Blessed Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Ukrainian Council will hold its next regular meeting on Monday, July 10, 2017 at 7:00 p.m. in the Church Hall. Please note the change in date for July. All men of parish are invited to attend to see what the Knights are all about and what they do and what you can do with them for your parish.

Saints Peter and Paul

The Holy and Pre-Eminent Apostles Peter and Paul

Gods’ love, mercy and compassion shine forth most clearly in the feast of these two apostles. Peter was enthusiastic in his faith in Christ, “Peter said to him, ‘Even though I should have to die with you, I will not deny you.’ And all the disciples spoke likewise. (Matthew 26:35)”

When the trial came, however, Peter did deny Christ three times, and all the apostles, except one, ran out of fear. Yet Peter wept for his weakness, and his weakness turned to strength, though not of his own human power, but by the grace of God. For when he confessed Jesus to be the Messiah, the Lord told him: “Simon Peter said … ‘You are the Messiah, the Son of the living God.’ Jesus said to him in reply, ‘Blessed are you, Simon son of Jonah. For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my heavenly Father,’ (Matthew 16:16-17) and it was on this rock of faith that the Church was established. Likewise, Saul closed his eyes to the truth, and persecuted Christians. But even as he was seeking Christians to persecute, the grace of God transformed his life, “On his journey, as he was nearing Damascus, a light from the sky suddenly flashed around him. He fell to the ground and heard a voice saying to him, “Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me?” He said, “Who are you, sir?” The reply came, “I am Jesus, whom you are persecuting. Now get up and go into the city and you will be told what you must do. (Acts 9:3-6)” It is the great Apostle Paul who later tells us: “[The Lord] said to me, ‘My grace is sufficient for you, for power is made perfect in weakness.’ I will rather boast most gladly of my weaknesses, in order that the power of Christ may dwell with me. (2 Corinthians 12:9)”

This is Christian faith: in weakness there is strength, in foolishness there is wisdom, in death, there is life. This the world does not understand. Today, as we honor these pre-eminent apostles, we, too, pray, “O God of mercy, love and compassion, give me the gift of your Spirit for strength in faith and hope and love, and that I may also show love, forgiveness and compassion to my neighbor.”

Meditation by Archpriest David Petras

Blessed Hieromartyr Nykyta Budka

Blessed Nykyta Budka is pictured as a bishop in the backyard of his residence-chancery in Winnipeg, Manitoba, circa 1920. Blessed Budka was the first Eastern Catholic bishop with jurisdiction in North America. (CNS photo/courtesy of Archives of the Archeparchy of Winnipeg) See BUDKA-BOOK March 26, 2015.
Blessed Nykyta Budka is pictured as a bishop in the backyard of his residence-chancery in Winnipeg, Manitoba, circa 1920. Blessed Budka was the first Eastern Catholic bishop with jurisdiction in North America. (CNS photo/courtesy of Archives of the Archeparchy of Winnipeg.)

Today, the Ukrainian Catholic Church honors the memory of Blessed Nykyta (Nicetas) Budka (1877-1949) in the Liturgy. He was a priest-martyr (hieromartyr) of the Church and St. John Paul II beatified him in 2001.

The Catholic Church in Canada remembers Blessed Budka on June 27, the day of his beatification along with other Ukrainians beatified. He died on 28 September 1949.

In history, Bishop Budka is an important figure in Ukrainian, Canadian, and Catholic history. His appointment, on 15 July 1912, was the first time the Church of Rome named an Eastern Catholic bishop with full jurisdiction outside of the old continent of Europe.

As such, he had concern, as an educator of the Ukrainian people who supported the aspirations of political and cultural freedom. He understood his mission was to sustain Canadian Ukrainian Greek-Catholics in their faith.

Bishop Budka attained from the government the recognition of the Ukrainian Catholic Church in Canada as a legal entity. Facing the reality of assimilation –which could have meant the dissolution of the Byzantine Ukrainian Catholics– he encouraged his flock to become good Canadians and to be faithful to their Church. He also dedicated himself to preserving Ukrainian religious and cultural identity.

For 17 years the saintly bishop was a moral support and spiritually accompanied the many Ukrainians who suffered under oppressive Polish, Nazi and Soviet regimes. Together with his fellow Ukrainian Catholic bishops, clergy, religious, and laity, he was arrested, tried, and condemned by Soviet authorities. He died in a prison camp in far-away Kazakhstan.

Bishop Budka’s as a life of obedience, work, and love of the Lord Jesus Christ and God’s pilgrim people.

Ukrainian Catholic Bishop Hlib Lonchyna of London said Blessed Nykyta was an effective “silent witness,” despite his life being “a great failure” in human terms. His martyrdom, the ultimate witness, “shows how the cross of Christ is victorious.”

Third Sunday after Pentecost

On this Third Sunday after Pentecost, the Church proclaims the Gospel of Matthew (6:22-34). Let us seek the Kingdom of God –together.

Our Lord today confronts one of the dilemmas of human life: how do we gain control of our lives? A lot of people want maximum control, but Jesus points out the foolishness of this: “Can any of you by worrying add a single moment to your life span? (v. 27) Of course, we should all strive for some control of our lives, as St. Paul tells us: “We boast of our afflictions, knowing that affliction produces endurance, and endurance, proven character, and proven character, hope. (v. 4)” One of the problems of life, however, is that over-control weakens our faith in God, and trespasses on the welfare of others. One of the most obscene sayings of the present age is Frank Sinatra’s song, “I did it my way.” We don’t have absolute control, St. Paul tells us, “God proves his love for us in that while we were still sinners Christ died for us. (v. 8) and Christ admonishes us, “Your heavenly Fathers knows that you need” food and drink and clothing. (vv. 31-32)

The resolution to this tension is at the end of the Gospel, in the teaching of our Lord, “Seek first the kingdom of God, and all these things will be given to you besides. (v. 33) But what is the Kingdom of God. At his trial, Jesus told Pilate, “My kingdom does not belong to this world. (John 18:36)” This does not mean it is somewhere up there in outer space, but that it is a voluntary sovereignty over our hearts. Governments must impose the laws by external force, they are not concerned with our souls, but the kingdom of God comes from our hearts and minds and souls. Only God can “control” our lives.

“Learn from the way the wild flowers grow. They do not work or spin. But I tell you that not even Solomon in all his splendor was clothed like one of them.(Matthew 6:28-29)”

Meditation by Archpriest David Petras

Apostolic Administrator appointed in Parma Eparchy

Today, the Holy Father appointed Bishop Milan Lach, SJ, as Apostolic Administrator for the Eparchy of Parma (OH). He is currently auxiliary bishop of Prešov of the Byzantines, Slovakia.

Bishop Milan Lach, S.J. 44, was educated in Trnava, Prešov, Košice and Rome. Among the other ministries he engaged he was the spiritual father at the Pontifical Collegium Russicum and also as spiritual assistant of the Federation of Scouts of Europe in Rome.

On 19 April 2013, Pope Francis appointed Lach as auxiliary bishop of the archieparchy of Prešov of the Byzantines, Slovakia.

Today, the new Parma Eparchy said,

“It’s interesting that my grandfather on my mother’s side, John Zavacky, was born near Chicago, on the territory of the present-day Parma Eparchy, and at age 4 returned with his parents and siblings back to Osturnja in Austria-Hungary, today in Kežmarok district. And so you see, history repeats itself. Just as my great-grandfather went off to the U.S. to find work more than 100 years ago, so will I go there now, so with God’s help I can guide these faithful and be a father to them.”

The Eparchy of Parma has been vacant since Bishop John Kudrick resigned in 2016. The Eparchy cover 12 US states.

Joseph Absi new Melkite Patriarch

Archbishop Joseph Absi, Patriarchal Vicar for Damascus, has been elected as the new Melkite Patriarch. Axios!‬

The new Patriarch celebrated his 71st birthday yesterday. He is 44 years a priest and 15 years a bishop and a member of the Melkite Paulist Order.

Eis pollá eti Déspota!

Michael Curkan, fell asleep in the Lord

Michael Curkan, 95, fell asleep in the Lord this past Sunday. He was the beloved husband of Denise Charlier Curkan for 70 years. Michael is survived by his three loving daughters, Marie Flanagan (Michael) of Florida, Alix Elkin (Steve) of Guilford and Jackie Herbert (Michael) of Fairfield; and four devoted grandchildren, Michael and Charles Herbert, Carley and Casey Elkin.

A close friend to many people, Mike was a member of the First Division of New Haven and Bridgeport.  Mike was a constant presence working on organizing the Ukrainian Veterans events for St. Michael’s Church.

Mike worked as a technician for the Regional Water Authority for 30 years prior to his retirement in the 1980’s.

Friends are invited to attend to attend the Funeral Liturgy at St. Michael’s Ukrainian Catholic Church, 569 George Street, New Haven, on Thursday morning at 10:30 a.m. There will be no calling hours. Burial at St. Lawrence Cemetery, West Haven.

Celentano Funeral Home is handling all the arrangements.

Father Paul Luniw is officiating.

Please offer a prayer for Mike and for the comfort of his family.

In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. Michael’s Ukrainian Catholic Church, 569 George Street, New Haven, CT 06511.

Eternal Memory.

150th Anniversary of Canonization of St Josaphat

On Sunday, June 25, 2017, His Beatitude Sviatoslav and the entire Ukrainian Catholic Church will celebrate 150th Anniversary of Canonization of Saint Josaphat. The Divine Liturgy will be celebrated on the main altar of Saint Peter’s Basilica in Rome.

Saint Josaphat, bishop of the Ukrainian Catholic Church (1618) – was Archbishop of Polotsk and founder of the Order of Saint Basil the Great. On June 29, 1867, Blessed Pope Pius IX canonized Blessed Josaphat and declared him as the Patron of Rus’. Saint Pope John Paul II called Saint Josaphat “apostle of unity”. Saint Josaphat is known as the patron of Ukraine.

Saint Josaphat, pray for us.

Parish announcements this week

Christ is our midst!

WELCOME ALL NEW PARISHIONERS! New parishioners are always welcome in our parish. If someone wishes to join, please contact Father Iura Godenciuc at 203 865-0388 or our financial secretary Natalie Chermak at 203 468-0367.

1. RECTORY: The rectory office will be closed until June 22, 2017. The Pastor, Fr. Iura Godenciuc, is on vacation. In case of emergency, please call Fr. Stepan Yanovsky at (203) 468-0367; Fr. Paul Luniw at (860) 583-7588; Fr. Ivan Mazuryk at (203) 367-5054.

2. VIGIL LIGHT: The vigil light in the sanctuary is burning this week to the Glory of God.

3. MEDICAL COLLECTION: From June 5 to June 19, 2017, we will be collecting items for a container shipment at our parish, or at the Ukrainian National Home of Hartford, 961 Wethersfield Avenue, Hartford CT 06114.

For more information, please contact Myron Melnyk (mmelnyk@yahoo.com ~ 203-397-2087) or Halia Lodynsky (halial@aol.com ~ 203-494-6278) in the New Haven CT area or Myron Kolinsky (myronkolinsky@yahoo.com ~ 860-563-4072) or Ivan Kebalo (ivank@onet.eu  ~ 860-299-6727) in the Hartford CT area.

4. ROOF REPAIR FUND: Please make a generous contribution to allow us to repair the leaking roof of the church hall and other roof structures adjoining the Church and the Hall. These roofs must be repaired to prevent serious water damage to our property and we cannot pay for them from regular weekly collection. Roof Repair Fund envelope are available in the vestibule of our church for your special sacrificial gift. Thank you for helping to keep our physical structures in good condition for our use today and for the next generation tomorrow.

5. ICE MAKER: Thanks to a donation from the Parish Knights of Columbus Council, a commercial grade ice maker has been donated to the parish. It is installed in the church hall kitchen.

6. MICROWAVE MACHINE: Thanks to a donation from the Parish Knights of Columbus Council, a microwave machine has been donated to the Parish. It is installed in the church hall kitchen. The previous unit has been retired from service.

7. PYROHY: The pyrohy’s have been fresh made yesterday. The next time that they will be made is in September. Extra pyrohy have been made and are available for sale in the church hall after the Liturgy. See or call the project director Walter Ushchak @ (203) 789-9554 for details.

8. KIELBASA: The Knights of Columbus Council have made a fresh batch of kielbasa meals yesterday. Fresh ¾ Kielbasa (Kovbasa) baked and fried, with 1+ pound of fresh cooked cabbage with a vegetable mix. A good meal for two people. Only $10.00. They will not be making them again until September. Extras were made and are available for sale in the church hall after the Liturgy. Or call (203) 789-9554 and leave a message with your order.

Second Sunday after Pentecost

On the First Sunday of the Great Fast, we heard the words from Hebrews, “Therefore, since we are surrounded by so great a cloud of witnesses, let us rid ourselves of every burden and sin that clings to us and persevere in running the race that lies before us while keeping our eyes fixed on Jesus, the leader and perfecter of faith. The whole forty-day journey through the Great Fast, to the Holy Week of our Lord’s Passion, and then through the fifty days of his resurrection and glorification, sending us the Holy Spirit to be with us always, we have kept our eyes fixed on Jesus. With open hearts we will find the perfection of our faith. This Epistle was repeated on All Saints’ Sunday, for those who have given themselves to Christ are the cloud of witnesses that support and strengthen our faith.

The Great Fast and the Holy Pentecostarion take up almost a third of the year of faith. Today we begin a second “third,” the proclamation of the Gospel of St. Matthew, which we read until the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross. This period again begins by summoning us to always “keep our eyes fixed on Jesus.” Today we are Simon and Andrew and James and John, hearing the voice of Jesus, “Come, follow me.” Today we hear the Lord calling us calling us to a life like his of caring for others and proclaiming the gospel, if not by words, by our actions and lives.

Meditation by Archpriest David Petras