Welcome!

20150301-ukraine-mem-service-jhv-lWhether you are visiting us for a brief time, looking for a new parish community, are returning to the practice of your Catholic faith, or are interested in finding out more about the Eastern Catholic Church, we’re happy to have you here.

St. Michael’s is a faith-filled people of the Ukrainian Catholic tradition. We strive to make the Divine Liturgy the heartbeat of our faith community and we stand ready to bear witness to the Lord with our life.

Saint Michael’s is a parish rooted in Jesus Christ, active in our love of neighbor, on the path toward salvation in the Holy Trinity.

Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ!

Sunday, 7/21, 6th Sunday after Pentecost —Our Venerable Father Simeon, the Fool for Christ and His Ascetical Companion John; the Prophet Ezekiel.

9:00 a.m. Michael and Anna Lipcan requested by Barbara and Patrick Bagley
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: Romans 12:6-14
Gospel: Matthew 9:1-81, Tone 5

Monday, 7/22, The Holy Myrrh-bearer and Equal-of-the-Apostles Mary Magdalene
9:00 a.m. No intention for the Divine Liturgy

Tuesday, 7/23, The Holy Martyrs Throphimus, Theophilus and Those with Them
9:00 a.m. +Allan Yursha (Pan.) requested by the Family

Wednesday, 7/24, The Holy Martyrs Borys and Hlib, Named Roman and David at Holy Baptism and the Holy Great Martyr Christine
9:00 a.m. No intention for the Divine Liturgy

Thursday, 7/25, The Dormition of Saint Anna, Mother of the Most Holy God-bearer Theotokos and the Holy Women Olympiada and Eupraxia
9:00 a.m. No intention for the Divine Liturgy

Friday, 7/26, The Holy Priest-Martyr Hermolaus and Those with Him
9:00 a.m. No intention for the Divine Liturgy

Saturday, 7/27, The Holy Great Martyr and Healer Panteleimon
9:00 a.m. No intention for the Divine Liturgy

Sunday, 7/28, 7th Sunday after Pentecost —The Holy Apostles and Deacons Prochor, Nicanor, Timon and Parmenas
9:00 a.m. +Frances Dmyterko (13th Anniv.) requested by the Family
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: Romans 15:1-7
Gospel: Matthew 9:27-35, Tone 6

Parish announcements this week

Christ is in our midst!

This week vigil light is offered to God’s glory by Catherine Kolesnik in memory of all deceased of Kolesnik family.

Physician-Assisted Suicide Presentation: Brother Columba Thomas, O.P., M.D. will present “Physician-Assisted Suicide as a Threat to Society and Human Persons: What Every Catholic Should Know.” This session will be especially helpful to care-givers, healthcare professionals and all seeking ongoing social justice updates. After the presentation a discussion and refreshments to follow. Tuesday, July 23rd, 7-8 p.m., St Joseph Hall, 129 Edwards Street, New Haven.

The ANNUAL HOLY DORMITION PILGRIMAGE will be held on August 10-11 at the motherhouse of the Sisters Servants of Mary Immaculate in Sloatsburg. This year’s theme is “Responding with the heart as did Mary and Josaphata”. The Sisters invite all our parishioners to attend! For information call: 845-753-2840 or http://www.ssmi-us.org

We have for sale frozen borscht for $5.00; cabbage and sausage (kapusta and kovbasa) for $10.00 and pyrohy (varenyky) in 2 dozen packages for $14.00. You can buy pyrohy after each Divine Liturgy or during the week if you call the rectory.

STAMFORD CHARITIES APPEAL

REMINDER: Please don’t forget to donate for Charities Appeal. The forms are designed for each family of our parish. Attached to the form is an envelope into which you can place your contribution. The form along with your contribution, we ask you enclose in the envelope and place it in the collection basket during church services. Please make check payable to the Byzantine Rite Eparchy of Stamford. DO NOT MAIL THIS FORM TO THE CHANCERY OFFICE. We sincerely ask all parishioners to make generous contributions.

The Connecticut State Ukrainian Day Committee wishes to invite all parishioners to attend this year`s Ukrainian Day Festival to be held on Sunday, September 8, 2019. The Festival will be held on the grounds of St. Basil’s Seminary, 161 Glenbrook Rd., Stamford. Advance general admission tickets are $5.00 per person, 12 and over are available from Luba Dubno. Tickets purchases at the gate will be $10.00 per person. This festival can’t exist if volunteers sign up during the day to help out. Please make that effort to volunteer.

The Facilities Maintenance Team of St. Michael’s schedules of work sessions for the entire year so that plans can be developed for doing all the projects and arrangements made for the purchase of required supplies and equipment. The usual time frame for the work sessions will run from 6:30 to about 9:30 p.m. All parishioners are invited to be a part of the team. Call Fr. Iura with your contact information.

St. Elijah the Prophet

Today, July 20, we celebrate the first man on the moon, July 20, 1969. It was the Feast of St. Elijah the Prophet, who also ascended into the heavens in a fiery chariot. Who says there is not a cosmic connection!

The Holy Great Prophet Elijah was one of the most important saintly figures for the Slav Peoples. In many cases, the peasant people lived in poverty and need from day to day. Elijah gave them hope, for he supplied for the needs of the widow of Zarephath in the time of drought:

“For the Lord, the God of Israel, says: The jar of flour shall not go empty, nor the jug of oil run dry, until the day when the Lord sends rain upon the earth.” (1 Kings 17:14) The farmers depended on the weather for the health of their crops, and very often for their very lives, and it was the Great-Prophet Elijah who was able to call down rain from heaven. Moreover, he was the hope of the future, having ascended into heaven in a fiery chariot, he was awaited as the forerunner of Christ in his second coming. He is for us, a model and rule of faith in God and in Jesus, his Messiah.

ELIJAH THE MAN OF ZEAL – he called down fire from heaven to consume our lawful sacrifice and to destroy the false priests of Baal. Elijah cried out to the Lord: ““I have been most zealous for the LORD, the God of hosts, but the Israelites have forsaken your covenant. They have destroyed your altars and murdered your prophets by the sword. I alone remain, and they seek to take my life.” 1 Kings 19:10 and 14) Therefore, the unfaithful king called Elijah “the disturber of Israel”(1 Kings 18:17) We pray that Elijah will disturb us, arouse us to faith, and strengthen our zeal for the Lord.

ELIJAH THE GIVER OF LIFE – When the widow of Zarephath lost her son, Elijah restored him to life. “Then he stretched himself out upon the child three times and he called out to the Lord: “Lord, my God, let the life breath return to the body of this child.” The Lord heard the prayer of Elijah; the life breath returned to the child’s body and he lived.” (1 Kings 17:21-22)

ELIJAH THE MAN OF GOD – On Mount Horeb, Elijah stood in the presence of God. He experienced the glory of God, not in the storm or the fire or the earthquake, but in the soft, gentle breeze. (1 Kings 19:11-12) We pray that there might be enough peace in our lives that we can hear God’s voice and not drown it out with the noise of our pride and unrest.

Mother Maria Skobtsova of Paris

Although the Orthodox Church honors Mother Maria Skobtsova of Paris as a saint, and not as of yet, the Catholic Church, she is a pivotal Christian who needs exposure among the Catholics. A true saint of the 20th century.

The historical note reads: “On January 18, 2004, the Holy Synod of the Ecumenical Patriarchate in Istanbul recognized Mother Maria Skobtsova as a saint along with her son Yuri, the priest who worked closely with her, Fr. Dimitri Klépinin, and her close friend and collaborator Ilya Fondaminsky. All four died in German concentration camps.”

One important excerpt from her biography in prison that some day, I can hope to actually apply to us:

“She was on good terms with everyone. Anyone in the block, no matter who it was, knew her on equal terms. She was the kind of person who made no distinction between people [whether they] held extremely progressive political views [or had] religious beliefs radically different than her own. She allowed nothing of secondary importance to impede her contact with people.”

Recommended is Jim Forest’s appreciative essay, “Mother Maria of Parish: Saint of the Open Door.”

 

St. Macrina

The Byzantine Church liturgically recalls Macrina (the Younger)  (c. 330 — 19 July 379), a nun in the Early Christian Church. The churches, East and West, honor her witness.  Her younger brother, Saint Gregory of Nyssa, composed her biography focusing heavily on her virginity and asceticism. The Church considers Macrina as a significant personage  especially after Nyssa basically set the standards for what it means to be  a holy Christian woman. He believed that a life of virginity reflected the “radiant purity of God.”

Our venerable mother was one of 9 children; several of her siblings were notables, two of whom were the Cappadocian Fathers.

The New Skete monks write of Macrina in this way:

Macrina was the older sister of the saints Basil and Gregory. After the early death of her husband, Macrina devoted herself to the education of her younger brothers. It was at this time, also, that she took up the monastic life, and it was due to her influence that her brothers learned the value of the spiritual life, and dedication to the service of the Church.

The mother of this remarkable family, St. Emelia, guided a small community of nuns on the family estate in Pontus. Macrina succeeded her mother as the head of the monastery, and in time founded other communities for women.

She spent her last days with her brother, Gregory, the bishop of Nyssa. The funeral oration he said over his sister is a moving testament to the love and esteem not only of a brother, but also one of many who were spiritually enriched by her example.

In literature, Gregory of Nyssa composed a “Dialogue on the Soul and Resurrection” (peri psyches kai anastaseos), entitled ta Makrinia (P.G. XLVI, 12 sq.), to commemorate Macrina

The Holy Vladimir

The holy Vladimir the Great, grand prince of Kiev and equal of the apostles, in baptism named Basil.

Vladimir descended from the Slavic-Viking line of Rurik. He began his princely career in Novgorod, and eventually, by cunning as much as by prowess, he took over his older brother’s inheritance and became Grand Prince of Kiev and the whole land of Rus’. His motives for becoming Christian were complex, but must have included the example of his grandmother, Olga, the conversion of a Viking cousin who proved Christianity could be a manly religion, and the prospects of allying himself to the Byzantine Empire through marriage. Nonetheless his decision was a momentous one, for it affected his entire domain. The sincerity of his reception of the Gospel is borne out by the effect it had on his rule. At a time when Europe and even the Byzantines were barbaric in punishing criminals, and even slight offenders, Vladimir outlawed torture, mutilation, and capital punishment. He sent food from his own stores to the poor and the sick, and organized social services unknown to any other city in Europe.

Much of the prince’s life was embellished by the legends of the early chronicles and epics have colored the liturgical texts. Tradition relates that he sent envoys to observe the organized religions of his prominent neighbors. What they experienced in Constantinople has remained a by-word for Orthodox liturgy. After attending services in Hagia Sofia, they reported to Vladimir: “We did not know whether we were in heaven or on earth!” In 988 a mass baptism was held in the Dnieper river by command of the prince, and Greek and Bulgarian missionaries began to spread the Gospel throughout Kievan Rus’.

Russians and Ukrainians have celebrated the millennium of this event, and our own church in America can trace its roots to that first taste of “heaven on earth.”

Vladimir died on this date in 1015 with a prayer on his lips. By mid-thirteenth century he was honored as a saint. In 1313 the first church was dedicated to him, in Novgorod, where he was first prince.

Meditation by New Skete Monks

Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ!

Sunday, 7/14, 5th Sunday after Pentecost —The Holy Apostle Aquila
9:00 a.m. For the people of the parish
10:30 a.m. +Emil Wysowskyj requested by Maria Wysowskyj

Epistle: Romans 10:1-10
Gospel: Matthew 8:29-9:1, Tone 4

Monday, 7/15, The Holy Grand Prince Vladimir (Volodymyr), Equal To The Apostles, Named Basil At Holy Baptism
9:00 a.m. +Christoforo Schiano (40 days, Pan.) requested by Luba Schiano

Tuesday, 7/16, The Holy Priest-Martyr Athenogenes and His Ten Disciples
9:00 a.m. +Fr. Vladimir Levitzky (Pan.) requested by Joseph Levitzky

Wednesday, 7/17, The Holy Great Martyr Marina
9:00 a.m. No intention for the Divine Liturgy

Thursday, 7/18, The Holy Martyr Hyacinth of Amastris; the Holy Martyr Emilian
9:00 a.m. No intention for the Divine Liturgy

Friday, 7/19, Our Venerable Mother Macrina, Sister of Saint Basil the Great
9:00 a.m. +Lajos Komondy(15th Anniv., Pan.) requested by Chris Komondy

Saturday, 7/20, The Holy and Glorious Prophet Elijah (Elias)
8:00 a.m. +Lillian and James Ryzewski (Pan.) requested by Jayne Ryzewski

Sunday, 7/21, 6th Sunday after Pentecost —Our Venerable Father Simeon, the Fool for Christ; and His Ascetical Companion John; the Prophet Ezekiel.
9:00 a.m. +Michael and Anna Lipcan; Barbara and Patrick Bagley
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: Romans 12:6-14
Gospel: Matthew 9:1-8, Tone 5

Parish announcements this week

Christ is in our midst!

This week vigil light is offered to God’s glory by Vasyl Ivantsiv memory of Dmytro.

CONGRATULATIONS to Mr. and Mrs. Igor Nakonechnyi on the birth of their daughter. May she grow in health and happiness and may she have God’s blessings all of her life.

65th ANNUAL HOLY DORMITION PILGRIMAGE will be held on August 10-11 at the motherhouse of the Sisters Servants of Mary Immaculate in Sloatsburg. This year’s theme is “Responding with the heart as did Mary and Josaphata”. The Sisters invite all our parishioners to attend! For information call: 845-753-2840 or www.ssmi-us.org

Zenon Luciw fell asleep in the Lord. His Funeral Liturgy was offered this past Thursday. Please remember him in your prayers. Eternal Memory!

We have for sale frozen borscht for $5.00; cabbage and sausage (kapusta and kovbasa) for $10.00 and pyrohy (varenyky) in 2 dozen packages for $14.00. You can buy pyrohy after each Divine Liturgy or during the week if you call the rectory.

STAMFORD CHARITIES APPEAL

REMINDER: Please don’t forget to donate for Charities Appeal. The forms are designed for each family of our parish. Attached to the form is an envelope into which you can place your contribution. The form along with your contribution, we ask you enclose in the envelope and place it in the collection basket during church services. Please make check payable to the Byzantine Rite Eparchy of Stamford. DO NOT MAIL THIS FORM TO THE CHANCERY OFFICE. We sincerely ask all parishioners to make generous contributions.

The UNWLA New England Region invites everyone to a picnic on July 28th at 12:00 in Southford Falls State Park, Southbury, CT. Food, a short program, games and activities foe children will be offered. A donation of $10.00 is requested and admission for children is free. Please bring your own chairs. The event is in a pavilion and tables are available. Everyone is invited! For further information call Hanya Salemme at 203-934-6520.

The newly formed Facilities Maintenance Team of St. Michael’s schedules of work sessions for the entire year so that plans can be developed for doing all the projects and arrangements made for the purchase of required supplies and equipment. The usual time frame for the work sessions will run from 6:30 to about 9:30 p.m. All parishioners are invited to be a part of the team. Call Fr. Iura with your contact information.

Awakenings —Adult Faith Formation: “The man called his wife Eve, because she became the mother of all the living.) (Gn 3: 20)