Welcome!

20150301-ukraine-mem-service-jhv-lWhether you are visiting us for a brief time, looking for a new parish community, are returning to the practice of your Catholic faith, or are interested in finding out more about the Eastern Catholic Church, we’re happy to have you here.

St. Michael’s is a faith-filled people of the Ukrainian Catholic tradition. We strive to make the Divine Liturgy the heartbeat of our faith community and we stand ready to bear witness to the Lord with our life.

Saint Michael’s is a parish rooted in Jesus Christ, active in our love of neighbor, on the path toward salvation in the Holy Trinity.

Sunday of the Fathers of the First Six Ecumenical Councils

In addition to the observance of the 8th Sunday after Pentecost, the Church remembers the Father of the First 6 Ecumenical Councils. Moreover, the Church also liturgically recalls the memory of the Great Holy Prince, and Equal to the Apostles, Saint Vladimir.

Today we celebrate the memory of the church teachers and pastors who in six councils held over three plus centuries (325-680) defined for us and for our faith who Jesus our Lord is. The central affirmation was in the Council of Chalcedon, whose fathers professed: “we all with one voice teach the confession of one and the same Son, our Lord Jesus Christ: the same perfect in divinity and perfect in humanity, the same truly God and truly man, of a rational soul and a body; of one essence with the Father as regards his divinity, and the same of one essence with us as regards his humanity; like us in all respects except for sin; begotten before the ages from the Father as regards his divinity, and in the last days, for us and for our salvation, the same born of Mary, the virgin God-bearer, as regards his humanity.” Even though the Oriental Orthodox Churches did not accept this council for political and semantic reasons, there is no doubt that they believe that our Lord is truly God and truly a human being, because this is essential for our faith. This feast reminds us that we are through faith truly united with God, who transforms us and restores the divine likeness. 

St. Maximus the Confessor especially emphasizes this in his theology, in many places, as in his Ambigua 4,8: “For there is nothing more unified than He, who is truly one, and apart from Him there is nothing [1045A] more completely unifying or preserving of what is properly His own. Thus, even when He suffered, He was truly God, and when He worked miracles the same one was truly man, for He was the true hypostasis of true natures united in an ineffable union. Acting in both of these natures in a manner suitable and consistent with each, He was shown forth as one truly preserving them unconfused, while, at the same time, preserving Himself without change, insofar as He remained impassible by nature and passible, immortal and mortal, visible to the eyes and known by the intellect, as God by nature and man by nature.” 

This is the real value of dogma, it tells us of the possibilities we have as human beings. It guides us to our full human nature, and perfection as commanded by Christ, “So be perfect, just as your heavenly Father is perfect. (Matthew 5:48)” It is the height of pride to think that we can reach our full potential without God, who alone creates, redeems and perfects our human nature.

Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

Read: 1 Corinthians 1:10-18; Matthew 14:14-22

At the end of the reading of St. Paul’s letter to the Corinthians today, St. Paul says, “The message of the cross is foolishness to those who are perishing, but to us who are being saved it is the power of God.” We are asked to look toward the Holy Cross as the center of our Christian life. In the section of 1 Corinthians immediately the Sunday reading, St. Paul says, “For Jews demand signs and Greeks look for wisdom, but we proclaim Christ crucified, a stumbling block to Jews and foolishness to Gentiles, but to those who are called, Jews and Greeks alike, Christ the power of God and the wisdom of God. For the foolishness of God is wiser than human wisdom, and the weakness of God is stronger than human strength.” 

The Christian faith is a paradox that finds strength in weakness, life in death and wisdom in foolishness. No wonder St. Paul observes today, “For Christ did not send me to baptize but to preach the gospel, and not with the wisdom of human eloquence, so that the cross of Christ might not be emptied of its meaning.” But what does the cross mean for our faith? Obviously, almost none of us will have to die as Christ did, nailed to a cross, though it is possible that some of us will have to surrender our lives for faith in Jesus. The gospel helps us to understand this. To carry the cross, we must put Jesus first in everything, as our Lord and Savior. It is he who feeds us with the bread of life in the desert of our lives. The multiplication of the loaves is a sign of the eucharist, of Christ giving himself to us, so that we might live in him and him alone. To accept the cross does not mean gratuitous suffering, but the will to live in Christ above all, to be so confirmed in faith that we would lay down our lives for him. 

The power of the cross, therefore, is not in human eloquence but in the reality of a soul alive in Christ, as St. Paul again proclaimed, “For through the law I died to the law, that I might live for God. I have been crucified with Christ; yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me; insofar as I now live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God who has loved me and given himself up for me. (Galatians 2:19-20)” It means, as in today Gospel, imitating the Lord, who “saw the vast crowd, [and] his heart was moved with pity for them, and he cured their sick.” We, too, must love and care for each other, if not healing one another in body, than in spirit.

Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

Read: Romans 15:1-7; Matthew 9:27-35

The Gospel for this Sunday can be summarized: Jesus went about doing good, healing the sick and revealing God’s love for all. St. Paul tells us the Jesus did this out of his goodness, not to please himself, not to glorify himself. From love for us, he took insults upon us upon himself. St. Paul concludes, “Welcome one another, then, as Christ welcomed you, for the glory of God” (Romans 15:7). In this way, we can heal one another’s spirit. Today’s epistle and gospel, then, tell us what love for one another really is. There is a condition, though, we must be open to God’s love. What does Jesus ask the blind men? “Do you believe I can do this?” If they believed they could be healed, then they also believed they needed healing, unlike the hypocritical Pharisees, to whom Jesus says, ““If you were blind, you would have no sin; but now you are saying, ‘We see,’ so your sin remains” (John 9:41). They, in bitterness and unfaithfulness, hurl the insult at Jesus, “He drives out demons by the prince of demons” (Matthew 9:34).

We are blind to the image of God in the other when we “demonize” them, and in reality, makes ourselves into demons. We should, instead, heal one another and not condemn.

Meditation by Archpriest David Petras

Parish announcements this week

Christ is in our midst!

WELCOME NEW PARISHIONERS! New parishioners are always welcomed in our parish. If someone wants to register with our parish please contact Father Iura Godenciuc at 203-865-0388 or our financial secretary Natalia Chermak.

VIGIL LIGHT: This week vigil light is offered to the glory of God by Christopher Komondy in memory of the deceased members of his family.

AFTER DIVINE LITURGY: Dear parishioners and guests, after each Divine Liturgy, coffee and hard rolls are available in the church hall.

SPECIAL SHARE IN THE EUCHARIST: You are invited to offer a donation for a week, month, or year the bread and wine that will become the Body and Blood of our Lord. The requested donation for one week is $20.00. Donors/Intentions will be listed. Mary’s lamp also available for offering. $10.00 a week.

We have frozen pyrohy for sale while supplies last. More information can be read here: http://stmichaelukrainian.org/pierogies/

KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS: The Knights of Columbus Blessed Metropolitan Andrey Sheptytsky Ukrainian Council will hold its next regular meeting TOMORROW, Monday, July 9, at 7:00 p.m. in the church hall. All men of the parish are invited to attend.

St. Gianna Center needs your help! The Center which assists at-risk pregnant women need diapers sized 3, 4, 5. Your donation would be greatly appreciated. A box is left at the front door of the church.

PARISH HALL BAZAAR: The Knights of Columbus will sponsoring a Parish Bazaar/tag sale scheduled for the weekend of August 25-26. This two-day event will enable parishioners to sell off their un-needed, surplus belongings. Parishioners have several choices as how to do this. 1) Rent a table for the weekend for $20.00, sell whatever you want for what you want. 2) Donate the items. The Knights of Columbus members will sell the items. Larger items will be considered for consignment. The Knight of Columbus will run the kitchen and sell food. A simple lunch menu will be provided. Reservations for the table rental can be made by placing a reservation note into the collection basket at Divine Liturgy. Checks should be made out to the Knights of Columbus. Please address any questions to Andy Bamber.  

STAMFORD CHARITIES APPEAL
In the church vestibule are arranged the forms for the Diocesan Charitable Fund. The forms are designed for each family of our parish. Attached to the form is an envelope into which you can place your contribution. The form along with your contribution, we ask you enclose in the envelope and place it in the collection basket during church services. Please make check payable to the Diocese of Stamford. Please DO NOT MAIL this form to the Chancery Office. We sincerely ask all parishioners to make generous contributions. Thank you for your generosity and may God reward you!

Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ!

Sunday, 7/8 —7th Sunday after Pentecost, The Holy Great Martyr Procopius
9:00 a.m. Special Intention
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: Romans 15: 1-7
Gospel: Matthew 9:27-35, Tone 6

Monday, 7/9 —The Holy Priest-Martyr Pancratius, Bishop of Tauromenia

Tuesday, 7/10 —Our Venerable Father Anthony of the Monastery of the Caves in Kyiv

Wednesday, 7/11 —Repose of Blessed Olga (Olha), Princess of Kyiv, named Helen in Baptism
8:00 a.m. +Ivan Sowa (Pan.) requested by Bohdan Sowa

Thursday, 7/12 —The Holy Martyrs Proclus and Hilary
9:00 a.m. God’s blessing and health for Natalie and Liubomyr Chermak

Friday, 7/13 —Synaxis of the Holy Archangel Gabriel

Saturday, 7/14 —The Holy Apostle Aquila

Sunday, 7/15 —8th Sunday after Pentecost, Commemoration of the Fathers of the First Six Ecumenical Councils; The Holy Grand Prince Vladimir (Volodymyr), Equal To The Apostles, named Basil in Baptism
9:00 a.m.  +Michael and Anna Lipcan requested by Barbara and Patrick Bagley
10:30 a.m. For people of the parish

Epistle: Corinthians 1:10-18
Gospel: Matthew 14:14-22, Tone 7

Sixth Sunday after Pentecost

Read: Matthew 9:1-8

The greatest human tragedy is sin, because “the wages of sin is death.” Sin is what robs us of life and of love. Sometimes we do not know what sin really is and we identify it with our human weaknesses and failings. But the true core of sin is pride, which fills us with self-righteousness (we don’t need God) and hatred for others (God’s creatures). Therefore, the paralytic man comes before Jesus and Jesus tells him, “Courage !! Your sins are forgiven.” 

The paralytic man was seeking a physical cure, but was unaware that a greater healing was needed, and that both physical and spiritual healing comes not from our own strength, but from God. Yet there is even a greater mystery here: the mystery of the Incarnation. By taking on human nature, the Word of God has brought the divine authority of forgiveness into the human race. Hear what the people exclaim, “the crowds were struck with awe and glorified God who had given such authority to human beings.” We continue to receive healing and forgiveness through the body of Christ, which is his Church (Ephesians 1:22-23). We must allow this forgiveness to change our lives and to walk in the path of faith, hope and love. 

This same story is also told in the gospel of Mark (2:1-12), which is read on the Second Sunday of the Great Fast, a season of forgiveness, and which supplies additional details about the cure.

Meditation by Archpriest David Petras

The July prayer intention of Pope Francis

Let us join our prayer with that of the Pope’s for this intention:

That priests, who experience fatigue and loneliness in their pastoral work, may find help and comfort in their intimacy with the Lord and in their friendship with their brother priests.

Prayers for all of our priests of the Stamford Eparchy, in particular our pastors and those who serve as our spiritual fathers and priest-friends.

Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ!

Sunday, 7/01/18 6th Sunday after Pentecost  —The Holy Unmercenaries and Wonderworkers Cosmas and Damian

9:00 a.m. +Rosemary and Michael Waselik requested by the Family
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: Romans 12:6-14
Gospel: Matthew 9:1-8, Tone 5

Monday, 7/02/18 —The Placing of the Precious Robe of Our Most Holy Lady and the Mother of God in the Church at Blachernae in Constantinople

9:00 a.m. God’s blessing and health for Stefaniya and her family requested by Stefaniya Tsitaridis

Tuesday, 7/03/18 —The Holy Martyr Hyacinth

9:00 a.m. +Ivan and Halyna Lobay (Pan.) requested by Maria Lobay

Wednesday, 7/04/18 —Independence Day of the USA and Our Father Andrew of Jerusalemite, Archbishop of Crete

Thursday, 7/05/18 —Our Venerable Father Athanasius of Athos

Friday, 7/06/18 —Our Venerable Father Sisoes the Great

Saturday, 7/07/18 —Our Venerable Father Thomas of Maleum and Acacius mentioned in the Ladder of Divine Ascent

Sunday, 7/08/18 7th Sunday after Pentecost —The Holy Great Martyr Procopius

9:00 a.m. Special Intention
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: Romans 15:1-7
Gospel: Matthew 9:27-35, Tone 6

Parish announcements this week

Christ is in our midst!

WELCOME NEW PARISHIONERS! New parishioners are always welcomed in our parish. If someone wants to register with our parish please contact Father Iura Godenciuc at 203-865-0388 or our financial secretary Natalia Chermak.

VIGIL LIGHT: This week vigil light is offered to the glory of God by Christopher Komondy in memory of the deceased members of his family.

AFTER DIVINE LITURGY: Dear parishioners and guests, after each Divine Liturgy, coffee and hard rolls are available in the church hall.

SPECIAL SHARE IN THE EUCHARIST: You are invited to offer a donation for a week, month, or year the bread and wine that will become the Body and Blood of our Lord. The requested donation for one week is $20.00. Donors/Intentions will be listed. Mary’s lamp also available for offering. $10.00 a week.

We have frozen pyrohy for sale while supplies last. More information can be read here: http://stmichaelukrainian.org/pierogies/

PARISH HALL BAZAAR: The Knights of Columbus will sponsoring a Parish Bazaar/tag sale scheduled for the weekend of August 25-26. This two-day event will enable parishioners to sell off their un-needed, surplus belongings. Parishioners have several choices as how to do this. 1) Rent a table for the weekend for $20.00, sell whatever you want for what you want. 2) Donate the items. The Knights of Columbus members will sell the items. Larger items will be considered for consignment. The Knight of Columbus will run the kitchen and sell food. A simple lunch menu will be provided. Reservations for the table rental can be made by placing a reservation note into the collection basket at Divine Liturgy. Checks should be made out to the Knights of Columbus. Please address any questions to Andy Bamber.  

STAMFORD CHARITIES APPEAL
In the church vestibule are arranged the forms for the Diocesan Charitable Fund. The forms are designed for each family of our parish. Attached to the form is an envelope into which you can place your contribution. The form along with your contribution, we ask you enclose in the envelope and place it in the collection basket during church services. Please make check payable to the Diocese of Stamford. Please DO NOT MAIL this form to the Chancery Office. We sincerely ask all parishioners to make generous contributions. Thank you for your generosity and may God reward you!

SISTERS SERVANTS OF MARY IMMACULATE invites you to the 64th Holy Dormition Pilgrimage on August 11-12. Theme “MARY, OUR MODEL OF PRAYER: Do Whatever He Tells You,” with His Beatitude Patriarch SVIATOSLAV (Shevchuk) and bishops of the Ukrainian and Byzantine (Ruthenian) Catholic Churches in the United States. Our special guests will be: His Eminence Timothy Cardinal Dolan, Archbishop of New York and Sister Sofija Lebedowicz, SSMI, Superior General.