Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ!

Sunday, 10/15/17  19th Sunday after Pentecost —Of the Fathers of the 7th Ecumenical Council
9:00 a.m. Special Intention
10:30 a.m.  For the people of the parish

Epistle: 2 Corinthians 11:31:12:9
Gospel: Luke 8:5-15, Tone 2

Monday, 10/16/17  The Holy Martyr Longinus the Centurion
8:00 a.m. no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Tuesday, 10/17/17  The Holy Prophet Hosea (8th c. BC); the Venerable-Martyr Andrew of Crete
8:00 a.m. no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Wednesday, 10/18/17  The Holy Apostle and Evangelist Luke
8:00 a.m. no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Thursday, 10/19/17  The Holy Prophet Joel; the Holy Martyr Varus
8:00 a.m. no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Friday, 10/20/17  The Holy Great-Martyr Artemius
9:00 a.m. +Dmytro Bodnar (Pan.) requested by Maria Wysowskyj

Saturday, 10/21/17  Our Venerable Father Hilarion the Great
9:00 a.m. +Ivan & Olena Godenciuc (Pan.)

Sunday, 10/22/17   20th Sunday after Pentecost —The Holy Wonderworker and Equal-to-the Apostles Abercius, Bishop of Hieropolis
9:00 a.m. +Hryhorij Dubno requested by the Family
10:30 a.m.  For the people of the parish

Epistle: Galatians 1:11:19
Gospel: Luke 16:19-31, Tone 3

Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ!

Sunday, 10/08/17 18th Sunday after Pentecost
9:00 a.m. +Anna Docknevich requested by Martin Docknevich
10:30 a.m.  For the people of the parish

Epistle: 2 Corinthians 9:6-11
Gospel: Luke 7:11-16, Tone 1

Monday, 10/09/17 The Holy Apostle James, Son of Alpheus
9:00 a.m. +Joseph Levitzky (Pan.) requested by Joseph M. Levitzky

Tuesday, 10/10/17 The Holy Martyrs Eulampius and Eulampia
9:00 a.m. +Catherine Levitzky (Pan.) requested by Joseph M. Levitzky

Wednesday, 10/11/17 The Holy Apostle Philip, One of the Seven Deacons
9:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Thursday, 10/12/17 The Holy Martyrs Probus, Tarachus and Andronicus; Our Venerable Father Cosmas of Jerusalem; Our Holy Father Martin the Compassionate, Bishop of Tours
8:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Friday, 10/13/17 The Holy Martyrs Carpus, Papylas and Agathonicus
8:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Saturday, 10/14/17 The Holy Martyrs Nazarius, Gervasius, Protasius and Celsus; Our Venerable Mother Paraskeva
8:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Sunday, 10/15/17 19th Sunday after Pentecost
9:00 a.m. Special Intention
10:30 a.m.  For the people of the parish

Epistle: 2 Corinthians 11:31:12:9
Gospel: Luke 8:5-15, Tone 2

Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ

Sunday, 10/01/17 17th Sunday after Pentecost — Protection of the Mother of God

9:00 a.m. For God’s blessing and health for Sophie DeCarlo on her 100 birthday requested by Barbara Schwartz
10:30 a.m.  For the people of the parish

Epistle: 2 Corinthians 6: 16-7:1
Gospel: Luke 6: 31-36, Tone 8

Monday, 10/02/17 The Holy-Priest Martyr Cyprian; and the Holy Martyr Justina; and Holy Andrew, Fool for the Sake of Christ
8:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Tuesday, 10/03/17 The Holy Priest-Martyr Dionysius the Areopagite
8:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Wednesday, 10/04/17 The Holy Priest-Martyr Hierotheus, Bishop of Athens; Our Venerable Father Francis of Assisi
9:00  +Ivan and Halyna Lobay (Pan.) requested by Maria Lobay

Thursday, 10/05/17 The Holy Martyr Charitina
8:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Friday, 10/06/17 The Holy and Glorious Apostle Thomas
6:00 p.m.  For God’s blessing and health for Michelle Turczyk and Trinidad Perez

Saturday, 10/07/17 The Holy Martyrs Sergius and Bacchus
8:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Sunday, 10/08/17 18th Sunday after Pentecost
9:00 a.m. +Anna Docknevich requested by Martin Docknevich
10:30 a.m.  For the people of the parish

Epistle: 2 Corinthians 9: 6:11
Gospel: Luke 7:11-16, Tone 1

Sixteenth Sunday after Pentecost

2 Corinthians 6:1-10; Luke 5:1-11

On this Sunday, we begin to read the Gospel of St. Luke, which will be the Word of God proclaimed to us in the Church Year from the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross to the coming Great Fast. It is fitting that this Sunday’s Gospel tells us what is involved in being a Christian. We all want to be called after Christ, but do we truly grasp what this will mean. One certain meaning of the Christian faith is that it is unexpected, that it brings great blessing out of the desert of the world: “After Jesus had finished speaking, he said to Simon, ‘Put out into deep water and lower your nets for a catch.’ Simon said in reply, ‘Master, we have worked hard all night and have caught nothing, but at your command I will lower the nets.’ When they had done this, they caught a great number of fish and their nets were tearing. (Luke 5:4-6)” This is the power of faith, which was again reaffirmed after Jesus’ resurrection: “When it was already dawn, [the risen] Jesus was standing on the shore; but the disciples did not realize that it was Jesus. Jesus said to them, ‘Children, have you caught anything to eat?’ They answered him, ‘No.’ So he said to them, ‘Cast the net over the right side of the boat and you will find something.’ So they cast it, and were not able to pull it in because of the number of fish. (John 21:4-6)”

The risen Christ is with us, filling all corners of our life. St. Paul in today’s epistle, expresses this Christian paradox very forcefully, “We are treated as deceivers and yet are truthful; as unrecognized and yet acknowledged; as dying and behold we live; as chastised and yet not put to death; as sorrowful yet always rejoicing; as poor yet enriching many; as having nothing and yet possessing all things. (2 Corinthians 6:8-10)” St. Paul warns that the true believer must suffer “afflictions, hardships, constraints, beatings, imprisonments, riots, labors, vigils, fasts, (2 Corinthians 6:4-5), but that “Behold, now is a very acceptable time; behold, now is the day of salvation. (2 Corinthians 6:2)” St. Peter is reduced to humility at the miraculous catch of fish and begs, “Depart from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man. (Luke 5:8)” Jesus does not accept this, just as he did not accept Peter’s refusal to have his feet washed at the Last Supper, ““Unless I wash you, you will have no inheritance with me. (John 13:8)” Instead, he makes him a fisher of men. Beloved in Christ, Jesus will also not accept our refusal to follow him, to love God with our whole heart and mind and soul, to love our neighbor as ourselves, as St. Paul exhorts us, “Working together, then, we appeal to you not to receive the grace of God in vain. For he says: ‘In an acceptable time I heard you, and on the day of salvation I helped you.’” (2 Corinthians 6:1-2)

Meditation by Archpriest David Petras

Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ!

Sunday, 9/24/17 16th Sunday after Pentecost
9:00 a.m. +Walter, Mary, Lillian, John requested by Cathy Kolesnik
10:30 a.m.  For the people of the parish

Epistle: 2 Corinthians 6:1-10
Gospel: Luke 5:1-11, Tone 7

Monday, 9/25/17 Our Venerable Mother Euphrosyne
9:00 a.m. +Maria Sowa (Pan.) requested by Bohdan Sowa

Tuesday, 9/26/17 The Passing of the Holy Apostle and Evangelist John the Theologian
9:00 a.m.  +Ivana Bohoslova

Wednesday, 9/27/17 The Holy Martyr Callistratus and His Wife
9:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Thursday, 9/28/17 Our Venerable Father and Confessor Chariton
9:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Friday, 9/29/17 Our Venerable Father Cyriacus the Anchorite
9:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Saturday, 9/30/17 The Priest-Martyr Gregory
9:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Sunday, 10/01/17 17th Sunday after Pentecost
9:00 a.m. Special Intention
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: 2 Corinthians 6:16:7:1
Gospel: Luke 6:31-36, Tone 7

Divine Liturgy for the coming week

Glory to Jesus Christ

Sunday, 9/17/17 Sunday after the Exaltation of the Cross
9:00 a.m. +Hryhorij Dubno requested by the Family
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: Galatians 2:16-20
Gospel: Mark 8:34-9:1,Tone 6

Monday, 9/18/17 Venerable Father Eumenes, Bishop of Gortyna, Wonderworker
8:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Tuesday, 9/19/17 Holy Martyrs Trophimus, Sabbatius, and Dorymedontus
9:00 a.m. Special Intention

Wednesday, 9/20/17 Holy Great-Martyr Eustathius and companions
9:00 a.m. +Aniela Gerula requested by Kateryna Szymkiw

Thursday, 9/21/17 Leave-taking of the Feast of the Exaltation of the Cross
9:00 a.m.   no special intention for the Divine Liturgy

Friday, 9/22/17 Holy Priest-Martyr Phocas, Bishop of Sinope
5:00PM God’s blessing for Brooks Patrick Converse and  Alicia Maria Wasynczuk

Saturday, 9/23/17 Conception of the Honorable and Glorious Prophet, Forerunner and Baptist John
10:00 a.m. For God’s blessing and health for teachers and students of Ridna Shkola

Sunday, 9/24/17 16th Sunday after Pentecost
9:00 a.m. +Walter, Mary, Lillian John requested by Kathy Kolesnik
10:30 a.m. For the people of the parish

Epistle: 2 Corinthians 6:1:10
Gospel: Luke 5:1-11, Tone 7

Sunday after the Exaltation of the Holy Cross

Galatians 2:16-20; Mark 8:34-9:1

The first sticheron of the Feast of the Holy Cross tells us, “By this Cross …. In his mercy (Christ) clothed us with beauty and made us worthy of heaven.” This is confirmed in the Hymn of Light from Matins: “The Cross is the beauty of the Church.” How can this be? For the Cross is ugly torture, and the Prophet Isaiah foretells of the Messiah:

“See, my servant shall prosper, he shall be raised high and greatly exalted. Even as many were amazed at him— so marred were his features, beyond that of mortals his appearance, beyond that of human beings. He had no majestic bearing to catch our eye, no beauty to draw us to him. He was spurned and avoided by men, a man of suffering, knowing pain, like one from whom you turn your face, spurned, and we held him in no esteem. (Isaiah 52:13-14; 53:2-3)”

One is reminded of St. Paul, “For you know the gracious act of our Lord Jesus Christ, that for your sake he became poor although he was rich, so that by his poverty you might become rich. (2 Corinthians 8:9)”  We might re-phrase: “In his ugliness, we have all been made beautiful.” Where is the beauty of the Cross? It is in the holiness of Jesus, who died that the Kingdom of God – life, love, mercy, wisdom – might be established in the world. We are called to “take up the cross,” which means uniting ourselves with Christ in love that the truth and wisdom and the glory of God might shine forth.

Today, therefore, St. Paul writes, “I have been crucified with Christ; yet I live, no longer I, but Christ lives in me; insofar as I now live in the flesh, I live by faith in the Son of God who has loved me and given himself up for me. (Galatians 2:19-20)”

Meditation by Archpriest David Petras

The Easier, Lighter Way of the Cross

 

Today’s meditation is done by Sr. Vassa Larin

“Then Moses led Israel onward from the Red Sea, and they went into the wilderness of Shur; they went three days in the wilderness and found no water. When they came to Marah, they could not drink the water of Marah because it was bitter; therefore it was named Marah. And the people murmured against Moses, saying, ‘What shall we drink?’ And he cried to the Lord; and the Lord showed him a tree, and he threw it into the water, and the water became sweet.” (Ex 15: 22-25a)

This passage is from the first reading at Vespers on the great feast of the Exaltation of the Cross, celebrated this Thursday (NC). What does this passage have to do with the feast? The “tree” that Moses throws into bitter water, and that makes the water sweet, is traditionally seen as an image of the “life-giving” Cross.

Water itself, essential for our biological life, is an image of life. But our life, in merely biological terms, devoid of Christ and His cross-carrying journey, can be bitter. The small and great pains through which we inevitably journey, as we transition from one life-situation to another, can be pure bitterness for us, outside of the Cross. Because from a Christ-less, Cross-less perspective, they are meaningless. And meaninglessness, as Carl Jung noted, is one of the biggest traumas of the modern-day psyche: Today we tend to fear, said Jung, that our lives are meaningless.

But in light of the com-passionate, co-suffering with us of the God-Man, Who walked through all our suffering and darkness, even unto death on a cross and descent into our hell, we are given new meaning and new purpose in our New Companion, our primary cross-carrier and Lord Jesus Christ, Who brings us new life through His death. Admittedly, He doesn’t explain to us the “meaning” of all our suffering. Instead He, Who is the eternal Logos, Meaning itself, takes on, in our shoes, all our darkness and suffering, by walking through it in His humanity, and then overcomes it in His divinity, trampling death “by death.” In communion with Him, we go forward His way, of walking through things, according to our responsibilities, rather than avoiding them. And then He does the rest, by His grace, overcoming in us our merely-human anxieties and discouragement, into which we easily slip when on our own, in self-reliance, trying to carry all the ups and downs of the world on our own shoulders. In Him, I discover the “ease” and “light” of His Way, if I just try it; if I try His “how,” rather than ask my “why,” and connect with Him today. “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden,” He says to me today, “and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me; for I am meek and humble in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” (Mt 11: 28-30) So let me try Him today, and find rest for my soul.

Holy Day Liturgies September 14

On Thursday, September 14th, we will celebrate the great feast of The Universal Exaltation of the Precious and Life-Giving Cross (known, simply as the Exaltation of the Holy Cross). By the Cross of Jesus Christ we are saved!
It is also a day of abstinence. We may not eat meat. (See Statutes, c. 476 2:4).
 
The Divine Liturgy will be offered at 9:00 a.m. (in Ukrainian) and again at 7:00 p.m. (in English).
 
Please come and pray, and bring a friend.

Sunday before the Exaltation of the Cross

Galatians 6:11-16; John 3:13-17

The Gospel today refers back to a story of Moses from the Old Testament:

“The Lord sent among the people seraph serpents, which bite the people so that many of the Israelites died. Then the people came to Moses and said, “We have sinned in complaining against the Lord and you. Pray to the Lord to take the serpents from us.” So Moses prayed for the people, and the Lord said to Moses: Make a seraph and mount it on a pole, and everyone who has been bitten will look at it and recover. Accordingly Moses made a bronze serpent and mounted it on a pole, and whenever the serpent bit someone, the person looked at the bronze serpent and recovered. (Numbers 21:6-9)”

This is a very unusual story, almost magical where a representation of a serpent is a healing talisman. However, for the Christian believer the full meaning is revealed only in our Lord Jesus Christ. St. John tells us that just as Moses raised the serpent in the desert, so Jesus was raised on the Cross so that anyone who looked upon him was healed of their sins. The serpent in the desert was not the serpent Eve saw in the tree in Eden, who brought death into the world through sin through his lie, but it was a serpent of life, who brought healing through the truth of faithfulness to God. But this was only a foreshadowing of Jesus. Of our Lord, St. Paul said, “For our sake God made him to be sin who did not know sin, so that we might become the righteousness of God in him. (2 Corinthians 5:21)” The serpent in the desert was bronze, yet brought salvation from the fatal bites of serpents. Jesus is truly God and truly a man, and brings the salvation of freedom from sin and death. Yes, “God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, so that everyone who believes in him might not perish but might have eternal life. (John 3:16) ” That is why in this great feast we celebrate this week, “We bow to your Cross and glorify your holy resurrection.”

Meditation by Archpriest David Petras